JITC Digest July 2018

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Inside this Issue:

Letter from the Editor

Dear JITC Readers,pedro-romero_1__1_.jpg

It was with great joy that I was able to share last month news of the Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer (JITC), the open access journal of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer published by Biomed Central – Springer Nature, having received its first impact factor of 8.374.

The impact factor is a critically important calculation involving the number of citations published articles received during a two-year timeline. Thus, this figure readily communicates to prospective authors the relative reach and quality of research a publication possesses.

Even before the publication of its impact factor, awareness of JITC had reached new heights in 2018, as submissions had already increased by 65 percent over last year. We know our 8.374 impact factor is merely a starting point from which JITC will grow in sync with the steady expansion of research and translation in the field of immuno-oncology. The number of submissions will multiply; the quality and breadth of research will increase; JITC will become an even stronger open access, peer-reviewed online journal.

I’d like to take this opportunity to thank all of JITC’s Section Editors, Associate Editors and reviewers who generously give so much of their time to ensure the journal publishes only the highest quality research in the field of cancer immunotherapy and tumor immunology.

Lastly, please take a moment to remember and celebrate the life and work of Harald von Boehmer who sadly passed away late last month. His contributions to the understanding of the T cell receptor’s key role in T cell development, differentiation, and central tolerance induction are part of the foundations of our current understanding of tumor immunology.

With best regards,
Pedro J. Romero, MD 
Editor-in-Chief, Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer


Research Highlights

In this edition of the JITC Digest, there are four noteworthy articles in the Clinical/Translational Cancer Immunotherapy section. The first article, “Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the immune microenvironment in non–small cell lung carcinomas as determined by multiplex immunofluorescence and image analysis approaches,” by Edwin R. Parra et al. provides a retrospective analysis of the immunological profile of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). Specifically, this study uses multiplex immunofluorescence and image analysis to demonstrate chemotherapy-induced changes in the tumor microenvironment of patients treated with NCT compared to those who underwent primary surgical resection without NCT. The results indicate that, contrary to previous thinking, chemotherapy may act ivate specific immune response mechanisms in NSCLC, priming a positive response to checkpoint immunotherapy. 

In the article, “Inhibition of WEE1 kinase and cell cycle checkpoint activation sensitizes head and neck cancers to natural killer cell therapies,” Jay Friedman et al. describes how AZD1775, a small molecule inhibitor of WEE1 kinase, prevents G2/M cell cycle checkpoint activation and sensitizes tumor cells to granzyme B-dependent natural killer (NK) cell lysis using a newly characterized murine NK cell line. Additionally, concomitant treatment of adoptively transferred murine NK cells with WEE1 kinase inhibition in immunocompetent mice with aggressive tumors prolonged survival over either treatment alone. These results provide rationale for the combination of NK cell therapies and targeted therapies that block cell cycle checkpoint activation.

Next, the article, “Pan-cancer adaptive immune resistance as defined by the Tumor Inflammation Signature (TIS): results from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA),” by Patrick Danaher et al. explores the TIS, an investigational use only, 18-gene signature shown to correlate with patients who respond to the PD1 inhibitor, pembrolizumab. The authors applied the TIS algorithm to over 9000 tumor gene expression profiles from the TCGA. They found that, similar to the tumor ranking determined by Spranger et al. (2016), tumors sensitive to PD-1 blockade had higher average TIS scores. Therefore, with an increased understanding of tumor immune profiles, they propose that integration of TIS scores may lead to improved indication selection for testing immunotherapeutics.

Finally, Alexander Shimabukuro-Vornhagen et al.’s article, ‘Cytokine release syndrome,” provides a comprehensive and timely review of the mechanisms underlying cytokine release syndrome pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, differential diagnoses, and prognostic factors. The immense progress experienced in the field of cancer immunotherapy bears the need for an enriched understanding of potential treatment-related toxicities in order to make immune oncology interventions safer and more effective.


Recent Articles

Immune oncology, immune responsiveness and the theory of everything

Tolga Turan, Deepti Kannan, Maulik Patel, J. Matthew Barnes, Sonia G. Tanlimco, Rongze Lu, Kyle Halliwill, Sarah Kongpachith, Douglas E. Kline, Wouter Hendrickx, Alessandra Cesano, Lisa H. Butterfield, Howard L. Kaufman, Thomas J. Hudson, Davide Bedognetti, Francesco Marincola and Josue Samayoa Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer6:50 (5 June 2018)
Hypothesis

From the Authors

"Anti-cancer immunotherapy is facing its own checkpoint. The effectiveness of checkpoint inhibition therapy is restricted to a minority of cancers endowed with a pre-existing immune infiltrate. Several models have been proposed to explain primary or secondary immune resistance to therapy. Missing is a unifying theory that could frame each model within a `satellite view’ of cancer and serve as a navigational tool for the rational selection of mono- or combination-therapies applicable to apposite sub-populations of patients. Here, we propose a strategy to unify individual models into a single unifying `Theory of Everything.’"

Francesco M. Marincola, MD — Refuge Biotechnologies

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with immunotherapy: brief review and case report

Masood Sadaat and Sekwon Jang Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer6:49 (5 June 2018)
Case Report

From the Authors

"Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and similar immune system hyperactivation syndromes can occur as potentially fatal immune related adverse events (irAEs) with PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 inhibitors, and CAR T cell and BiTe therapies. Diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines for malignancy- and immunotherapy-associated HLH are lacking, which complicates early diagnosis and management. The article describes cases of HLH, macrophage activation syndrome, and cytokine release syndrome due to various immunotherapeutic agents, and provides information regarding early recognition, diagnostic criteria and treatment approaches."

Masood Sadaat, MD, MSc – Inova Fairfax Hospital

Dexamethasone-induced immunosuppression: mechanisms and implications for immunotherapy

Amber J. Giles, Marsha-Kay N. D. Hutchinson, Heather M. Sonnemann, Jinkyu Jung, Peter E. Fecci, Nivedita M. Ratnam, Wei Zhang, Hua Song, Rolanda Bailey, Dionne Davis, Caitlin M. Reid, Deric M. Park and Mark R. Gilbert Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer6:51 (11 June 2018)
Research Article

From the Authors

"Immunosuppressive corticosteroids are first-line agents against immune-related adverse events arising from checkpoint blockade in patients with cancer. However, for patients with intracranial tumors, corticosteroids are often initiated at the time a brain tumor is discovered and continued during surgery and chemoradiation, a period that can span 8-12 weeks. Therefore, patients with intracranial tumors are likely to be exposed to corticosteroids before receiving immunotherapy. This study interrogated the impact of corticosteroids on adaptive anti-tumor immunity and confirmed that corticosteroids markedly impair the immune response if administered prior to immunotherapy. Conversely, corticosteroids do not diminish an established immune response. These results indicate that corticosteroid use should be avoided during the initiation of immunotherapy and that clinical trials should exclude patients requiring corticosteroids in order to increase the likelihood of response."

Amber J. Giles, PhD – National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the immune microenvironment in non–small cell lung carcinomas as determined by multiplex immunofluorescence and image analysis approaches

Edwin R. Parra, Pamela Villalobos, Carmen Behrens, Mei Jiang, Apar Pataer, Stephen G. Swisher, William N. WilliamJr, Jiexin Zhang, Jack Lee, Tina Cascone, John V. Heymach, Marie-Andrée Forget, Cara Haymaker, Chantale Bernatchez, Neda Kalhor, Annikka Weissferdt, Cesar Moran, Jianjun Zhang, Ara Vaporciyan, Don L. Gibbons, Boris SepesiEmail author and Ignacio I. Wistuba

Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:48 (6 June 2018)
Research Article

About

Edwin R. Parra et al. provides a retrospective analysis of the immunological profile of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). Specifically, this study uses multiplex immunofluorescence and image analysis to demonstrate chemotherapy-induced changes in PD-L1/PD-1 expression and tumor-associated immune cells of patients treated with NCT compared to those who underwent primary surgical resection without NCT. The results indicate that, contrary to previous thinking, chemotherapy may activate specific immune response mechanisms in NSCLC, priming a positive response to checkpoint immunotherapy.

Thoracic and cutaneous sarcoid-like reaction associated with anti-PD-1 therapy: longitudinal monitoring of PD-1 and PD-L1 expression after stopping treatment

Léa Paolini, Caroline Poli, Simon Blanchard, Thierry Urban, Anne Croué, Marie-Christine Rousselet, Sarah Le Roux, Nathalie Labarrière, Pascale Jeannin† and José Hureaux†
†Contributed equally
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:52 (13 June 2018)
Case Report

About

Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have transformed the treatment arena and prognosis for lung cancer patients. However, with such immense progress in restoring a patient’s antitumor immune response comes related adverse events, such as sarcoidosis. Lea Paolini et al. report the first case of a thoracic and cutaneous sarcoid-like reaction in a patient with a relapsing, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with nivolumab, shedding light on the complex regulation of PD-1/PD-L1 expression and the importance of monitoring the immune response during and after treatment with ICI.

Expression of human CD46 and trans-complementation by murine adenovirus 1 fails to allow productive infection by a group B oncolytic adenovirus in murine cancer cells*

Janet Lei, Egon J. Jacobus, William K. Taverner, Kerry D. Fisher, Silvio Hemmi, Katy West, Lorna Slater, Fred Lilley, Alice Brown, Brian Champion, Margaret R. Duffy and Len W. Seymour
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:55 (13 June 2018)
Research Article

From the Authors

"Translational development of oncolytic vaccines, based on human-specific viruses, would be greatly enhanced by the availability of immunocompetent animal tumour modules that can study virus infection in the context of a functional immune system. We therefore consider it imperative to define the species-related blocks to virus activity in murine cancer cells, and to develop models that can be used to support the oncolytic activity of human-specific viruses."

Leonard W. Seymour, PhD - Oxford University

*This article is part of JITC’s Microbial-Based Cancer Therapy special series. Articles in this series describe the complex nature of the microbe-tumor interaction and discuss recent advances in the field that take advantage of the unique ability of microbes to invade human cells and induce immune responses in order to create therapeutic approaches that direct microbes to selectively target tumors.

Immunomodulatory activities of pixatimod: emerging nonclinical and clinical data, and its potential utility in combination with PD-1 inhibitors**

Edward Hammond, Nicole M. Haynes, Carleen Cullinane, Todd V. Brennan, Darryn Bampton, Paul Handley, Tomislav Karoli, Fleur Lanksheer, Liwen Lin, Yiping Yang and Keith Dredge
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:54 (14 June 2018)
Research Article

From the Authors

“Pixatimod (PG545) is a clinical-stage immunomodulator currently under investigation with nivolumab in advanced and pancreatic cancers (Clinical Trial ID: ACTRN12617001573347). Though multiple preclinical studies have demonstrated additive or synergistic activity with chemotherapy, this is the first study to show the potential utility of pixatimod with a PD1 inhibitor. Importantly, the paper also explores the nonclinical and clinical exposure and safety data, with in-depth comparisons of key safety parameters across species. We hope that readers will gain a deeper understanding of pixatimod’s nonclinical and clinical safety profile, and its potential utility in combination with other I-O agents”

Keith Dredge, PhD - Zucero Therapeutics

**This article is part of JITC's Emerging Immunotherapeutic Agents special series. All articles in this series cover details beyond standard JITC articles, providing readers with a unique collection of cutting-edge cancer immunotherapy research.

Rhabdomyolysis during high dose interleukin-2 treatment of metastatic melanoma after sequential immunotherapies: a case report

Joseph I. Clark, Shams Bufalino, Shruti Singh and Ewa Borys
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:53 (14 June 2018)
Case Report

From the Authors

“Sequencing of immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of malignant melanoma, and for a number of other malignancies for that matter, is becoming common place. Understanding potential unique toxicities associated with such sequencing will be an important area of investigation as immunotherapeutic advancements continue.”

Joseph I. Clark, MD – Loyola University Medical Center

Cytokine release syndrome

Alexander Shimabukuro-Vornhagen†, Philipp Gödel†, Marion Subklewe, Hans Joachim Stemmler, Hans Anton Schlößer, Max Schlaak, Matthias Kochanek, Boris Böll and Michael S. von Bergwelt-Baildon
†Contributed equally
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:56 (15 June 2018)
Review

Excerpt

“With growing experience in the clinical application of these potent immunotherapeutic agents comes the increasing awareness of their inherent and potentially fatal adverse effects, most notably the cytokine release syndrome (CRS). This review provides a comprehensive overview of the mechanisms underlying CRS pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, differential diagnoses, and prognostic factors.”

Targeting adenosine for cancer immunotherapy

Robert D. Leone and Leisha A. Emens
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:57 (18 June 2018)
Review Article

From the Authors

"Adenosine signaling creates a cloud in the tumor microenvironment that suppresses immunity. Targeting adenosine signaling may lift that cloud and enhance the response to immunotherapy."

Leisha A. Emens, MD, PhD — Johns Hopkins University

Near complete response to Pembrolizumab in microsatellite-stable metastatic sebaceous carcinoma

Evidio Domingo-Musibay, Paari Murugan, Alessio Giubellino, Sandeep Sharma, Daniel Steinberger, Jianling Yuan, Matthew A. Hunt, Emil Lou and Jeffrey S. Miller
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:58 (19 June 2018)
Case Report

From the Authors

"This is the first report describing objective clinical and radiographic responses following immunotherapy for widely metastatic sebaceous carcinoma. The dramatic therapeutic response to pembrolizumab was associated with peripheral blood circulating memory T cells and mature Natural Killer cells after 6 months (24 weeks) of therapy. This report supports prospective clinical trials of anti-PD1 checkpoint blockade for metastatic sebaceous carcinoma."

Evidio Domingo-Musibay, MD — University of Minnesota Medical School

Enhanced susceptibility of cancer cells to oncolytic rhabdo-virotherapy by expression of Nodamura virus protein B2 as a suppressor of RNA interference

Donald Bastin†, Amelia S. Aitken†, Adrian Pelin, Larissa A. Pikor, Mathieu J. F. Crupi, Michael S. Huh, Marie-Claude Bourgeois-Daigneault, John C. Bell and Carolina S. Ilkow
†Contributed equally
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:62 (19 June 2018)
Short Report

About

Many human cancers do not respond to oncolytic virotherapy. Donald Bastin et al. investigates the basic biology of viral defense mechanisms in cancer and presents data which establishes the improved therapeutic potential of a novel virus which targets the RNAi-mediated antiviral defense in human cancer cells.

*This article is part of JITC’s Microbial-Based Cancer Therapy special series. Articles in this series describe the complex nature of the microbe-tumor interaction and discuss recent advances in the field that take advantage of the unique ability of microbes to invade human cells and induce immune responses in order to create therapeutic approaches that direct microbes to selectively target tumors.

Phase Ia study of the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) inhibitor navoximod (GDC-0919) in patients with recurrent advanced solid tumors

Asha Nayak-Kapoor, Zhonglin Hao, Ramses Sadek, Robin Dobbins, Lisa Marshall, Nicholas N. Vahanian, W. Jay Ramsey, Eugene Kennedy, Mario R. Mautino, Charles J. Link, Ray S. Lin, Stephanie Royer-Joo, Xiaorong Liang, Laurent Salphati, Kari M. Morrissey, Sami Mahrus, Bruce McCall, Andrea Pirzkall, David H. Munn, John E. Janik and Samir N. Khleif
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:61 (20 June 2018)
Research Article

About

This open-label Phase Ia study assesses safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary anti-tumor activity of the novel Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) small molecule inhibitor, navoximod, in patients with recurrent/advanced solid tumors. As evidenced in the current study, data demonstrate that IDO inhibitors produce minimal antitumor activity when given alone. However, emerging clinical data from Phase I/II studies suggest the potential for increased benefit from a combination approach with IDO inhibitors and targeted immunotherapy drugs.

OXIDIZED LIPIDS KEEP HEAT SHOCK CHAPERONES BUSY: NEW INSIGHTS ON THE DEFICIENCIES OF TUMOUR-ASSOCIATED DENDRITIC CELLS

Paula Nunes-Hasler
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:60 (20 June 2018)
Commentary

From the Author

"A recent publication by Veglia et al. shows that oxidized lipids sequester the cytosolic chaperone HSP70, and that this contributes to reduced cross-presentation in dendritic cells from tumour-bearing mice. This commentary discusses these results in the context of the multiple roles of HSP70, lipid droplet function, and MHC-I trafficking, as well as their impact on future cancer therapy designs."

Paula Nunes-Hasler, PhD – University of Geneva

Inhibition of WEE1 kinase and cell cycle checkpoint activation sensitizes head and neck cancers to natural killer cell therapies

Jay Friedman†, Megan Morisada†, Lillian Sun†, Ellen C. Moore, Michelle Padget, James W. Hodge, Jeffrey Schlom, Sofia R. Gameiro and Clint T. Allen
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:59 (21 June 2018)
Research Article

From the Authors

"While mechanisms of tumor cell immune escape based on the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment are well studied, tumor cell intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to effector immune cell killing are less understood. The ability to reverse tumor G2/M cell cycle pause in response to granzyme B with a small molecule inhibitor of Wee1 kinase is an exciting finding that we hope translates into improved efficacy of a diverse array of immunotherapies in clinical trials."

Clint T. Allen, MD – National Institutes of Health

Pan-cancer adaptive immune resistance as defined by the Tumor Inflammation Signature (TIS): results from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)*

Patrick Danaher, Sarah WarrenView ORCID ID profile, Rongze Lu, Josue Samayoa, Amy Sullivan, Irena Pekker, Brett Wallden, Francesco M. Marincola and Alessandra Cesano
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, 6:63 (22 June 2018)
Research Article

From the Authors

"The Tumor Inflammation Signature (TIS) is an 18 gene analytically validated signature which detects the presence of an adaptive immune response peripherally suppressed in the tumor microenvironment by measuring the expression of genes associated with cytotoxic cells, antigen presentation, and IFNγ activity. The TIS has previously been shown to enrich, in a tumor-type agnostic manner, for a population of patients who responds to immune checkpoint blockade. Since the TIS (reagents, instrumentation, algorithm and software) has been analytically developed as an IUO diagnostic assay, the test can be prospectively deployed for patient selection in clinical trials. In this paper we characterized the level of the TIS across a range of tumor gene expression data downloaded from the TCGA in order to understand the prevalence of the tumor “inflamed” phenotype within and between tumor types. In addition, we evaluate how TIS level correlates with other relevant variables such as mutation load, other gene expression signatures, and clinical outcomes in the absence of specific immune therapeutic intervention (i.e. prognosis). Finally, to screen for novel suppressive mechanisms, this study searched for biological pathways associated with low TIS scores."

Alessandra Cesano, MD, PhD – NanoString, Inc.

*This article is part of JITC's Emerging Immunotherapeutic Agents special series. All articles in this series cover details beyond standard JITC articles, providing readers with a unique collection of cutting-edge cancer immunotherapy research.


Highly Accessed Articles

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An update on the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on tumor immunotherapy for the treatment of cutaneous melanoma: version 2.0

Ryan J. Sullivan, Michael B. Atkins, John M. Kirkwood, Sanjiv S. Agarwala, Joseph I. Clark, Marc S. Ernstoff, Leslie Fecher, Thomas F. Gajewski, Brian Gastman, David H. Lawson, Jose Lutzky, David F. McDermott, Kim A. Margolin, Janice M. Mehnert, Anna C. Pavlick, Jon M. Richards, Krista M. Rubin, William Sharfman, Steven Silverstein, Craig L. SlingluffJr, Vernon K. Sondak, Ahmad A. Tarhini, John A. Thompson, Walter J. Urba, Richard L. White, Eric D. Whitman, F. Stephen Hodi and Howard L. Kaufman
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer 2018, 6:44 (30 May 2018)

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Predicting response to checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma beyond PD-L1 and mutational burden

Carl Morrison†, Sarabjot Pabla†, Jeffrey M. Conroy, Mary K. Nesline, Sean T. Glenn, Devin Dressman, Antonios Papanicolau-Sengos, Blake Burgher, Jonathan Andreas, Vincent Giamo, Moachun Qin, Yirong Wang, Felicia L. Lenzo, Angela Omilian, Wiam Bshara, Matthew Zibelman, Pooja Ghatalia, Konstantin Dragnev, Keisuke Shirai, Katherine G. Madden, Laura J. Tafe, Neel Shah, Deepa Kasuganti, Luis de la Cruz-Merino, Isabel Araujo, Yvonne Saenger, Margaret Bogardus, Miguel Villalona-Calero, Zuanel Diaz, Roger Day, Marcia Eisenberg, Steven M. Anderson, Igor Puzanov, Lorenzo Galluzzi, Mark Gardner and Marc S. Ernstoff
†Contributed equally
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer 2018, 6:32 (9 May 2018)

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Current landscape and future of dual anti-CTLA4 and PD-1/PD-L1 blockade immunotherapy in cancer; lessons learned from clinical trials with melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

Young Kwang ChaeEmail author, Ayush Arya, Wade Iams, Marcelo R. Cruz, Sunandana Chandra, Jaehyuk Choi and Francis Giles
Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer 2018, 6:39 (16 May 2018)


Submit Your Research to SITC 2018 by Aug. 1, 2018

The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) seeks submissions of regular abstracts and late-breaking abstract applications to its 33rd Annual Meeting, as well as presentation applications to its program on immune escape and mechanism of resistance.
Click any of the following links for more information on submitting your:
Available only for SITC members, SITC will present 33 travel awards to young investigators during the 33rd Annual Meeting recognizing excellence in novel research.
All materials must be submitted by 5 p.m. PDT on Aug. 1, 2018.


Submit Your Research to JITC

SITC Members Receive Complimentary Article Processing Charges in 2018*
SITC members and non-members are invited to submit manuscripts to the society's official journal.
Article Types
JITC Editor-in-Chief
Pedro J. Romero, MD – University of Lausanne

Section Editors

  • Basic Tumor Immunology: Cornelis J.M. Melief, MD, PhD – ISA Therapeutics BV
  • Case Reports: Alfred Zippelius, MD – University Hospital Basel
  • Clinical/Translational Cancer Immunology: James L. Gulley, MD, PhD, FACP – National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
  • Clinical Trials Monitor: Leisha A. Emens, MD, PhD – Johns Hopkins University
  • Commentary/Editorials: Christian Capitini, MD – University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • Guidelines and Consensus Statements: Robert L. Ferris, MD, PhD – University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute
  • Immunotherapy Biomarkers: Lisa H. Butterfield, PhD – University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute
  • Reviews: Sandra Demaria, MD – Weill Cornell Medical College; Thomas F. Gajewski, MD, PhD – University of Chicago

To view the full editorial board, please click here.

*As a way to thank the dedicated society members who tirelessly work to advance the science and ultimately to improve the lives of patients with cancer, one article per SITC member is eligible for waived article processing charges through 2018. To take advantage of this benefit valued at more than $2,400, authors must contact JITC Managing Editor Andrea Rindo at JITCEditor@sitcancer.org or 1-414-271-2456 prior to submission to obtain a discount code and instructions.

Join_SITC_JITC.png?r=1499893816711 Become a Member!

Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer (JITC) is the official, online, open access journal of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) and considered BMC’s premier cancer immunotherapy journal. JITC welcomes basic, translational and clinical research and literature reviews on any aspect of tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy. Topics of interest include tumor-host interactions, immune biomarkers, novel therapeutics, and immune-related toxicity.  The journal’s full collection, including its seminal guidelines and consensus statements, advances the rapidly evolving field of cancer immunotherapy through dissemination of rigorous peer-reviewed research.